History of the Church

(Established 1926)

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Holy Family Church is a Catholic Church under the direction of the Archdiocese of Brisbane. It is located at 37 Ward Street, in the Brisbane suburb of Indooroopilly, approximately six kilometres from CBD of Brisbane.

This striking church is one of Australia’s finest examples of Modernist architecture. The Church of the Holy Family was built between 1961 and 1963, and was designed by Brisbane architectural firm, Douglas and Barnes. From architectural and engineering perspectives, the design of this Catholic church was extremely progressive for the time. A new method of concrete construction was adopted to form the pleated concrete structure.

hfindro960 - 9This was outlined in the Catholic Leader at the time: “The main structure, ‘growing’ out of the sloping site and towering over the surrounding area, is cast ‘in situ’… The method of construction was most unusual. The foundations, ground floor and main floor were poured in the normal manner. However, the upper portion of the building was constructed from end to end by means of a mobile steel framed collapsible Jumbo. Instead of the building growing upwards, it grew longitudinally” (The Catholic Leader, November 1963). The Catholic Church commissioned several important Queensland artists to create pieces for the new building. Internationally recognised artist Ray Crooke, was commissioned to paint the ‘Stations of the Cross’ on the internal walls. Crooke has won many prestigious awards, including the Archibald Prize in 1969. He was awarded an Order of Australia for services to the visual arts in 1993 and an Honorary Doctorate from Griffith University in 1996.

The two sculptures on the church’s exterior, ‘Finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple’ and ‘The Holy Family’ were created by Brisbane artist, Edwin A Guth. The baptistery, situated beside the church entrance and connected by the covered walkway, was designed as a precast concrete octagonal structure, with a high concrete spire. The coloured glass on the walls resembles the leadlight windows in more traditional churches. These mosaic windows represent the Seven Sacraments and were designed by local artist, Andrew Sibley.

The Church of the Holy Family was the last major building project for Catholic Archbishop James Duhig, under whose leadership many of Brisbane’s most outstanding Catholic buildings had been built.

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1 Erin Ahearn, Diamond Jubilee: Holy Family Parish, Indooroopilly, 1926-1986 ([Indooroopilly: The Parish], 1986).

2 Plaque at Holy Family Church cited by G. Cox, 2009.

3 Date supplied to G. Cox by Kevin Whitehouse, c.1973.

4 Personal communication to G. Cox from Mr J.H. Whitehouse, June 1974.

5 Specification noted by G. Cox, 1973; additional details supplied by Dr Wesley Jordan, 2003.

wreath

xmas-special

Holy Family Indooroopilly 

 

Christmas Events and Mass Times

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Ann Paxton-Hall

Ann Paxton-Hall

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Easter 2017 

          ( No Mass on Easter Sunday Evening) 

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From Father Nev

14-4-19 – Palm Sunday

  Thank you everyone for your prayers and support during our Clergy Convocation. It was a really blessed and anointed time. As we emerge from the other side of the Royal Commission, the Church and parishes here in Brisbane sensed there was a need for a new model of leadership and parish renewal. We certainly received some amazing formation from Ron Huntley. He was the 2IC behind the success of the St Benedict’s parish Halifax, Canada aka Divine Renovation. There was the reminder for the priest to have a God-sized mission that compels parishioners to want to hear more and eventually become super engaged in their Church. We all did a test called APEST (stands for 5 different charisms – Apostolic, Prophets, Evangelistic, Shepherds and Teachers.) Basically there are two of the five that we primarily work out from. My top two were Apostolic and Teaching. In general terms, my role here as pastor has been a driver. As you’ve probably observed I’ve been trying to forge a way forward in collaboration with parishioners to help grow our parish. Secondly I’ve also been trying to incorporate the basic teachings of the Jesus Christ and the Church through numerous mediums. I’ll continue with more of this stimulating stuff when we eventually get to Easter. As we reach the cusp of Holy Week, I encourage you to attend as many of the liturgies of the Paschal Triduum. On Palm Sunday we accompany Jesus into Jerusalem. We just like the crowds, praise and celebrate Christ’s kingship. At Holy Thursday we spend those special moments as Jesus breaks bread with his disciples one last time. He demonstrates the kind of leadership we as followers and the Church need to model through the washing of the feet. This all changes though in the blink of an eye as we turn against our Lord and descend into the darkness of our sin. Just as the disciples, we too struggle to stay awake with Jesus. Can we spend more than one hour praying with him? On Good Friday, we enter properly into the Lord’s Passion. Each of us has moments where we wash our hands of any responsibility. We attempt to carry our cross but lose our strength and stumble. More often than not we are the ones who are pushing the weight of our sins onto Jesus. We are often helped by friends and strangers alike such as Simon, Veronica and the women. In contrast we can be the very people who spit, mock and crucify Jesus. Finally we all re-emerge on Holy Saturday, when Jesus leaves the tomb of sin and death. His light and salvation breaks forth in our world for our celebration of the Easter season. 



Blessings Fr Nev

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Christmas Message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge

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Brisbane Archdiocese Video Series – The Mass

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By Dr. Peter VardyTHE REFORMATION TODAY: AN ECUMENICAL PERSPECTIVE 

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Many historians consider the Reformation one of those epoch changing events in the history of the Western world. But what does it mean for people in Australia 500 years later? Was the Reformation just a series of pointless disputes which have little relevance to the church today? Or is the church today the living legacy of the Reformation, and if so, what does this mean for us? Join us as we ask these questions together.

Dr. Chris Hanlon — The Reformation a Catholic perspective, 8 August 7:30pm Holy Family Catholic Church, Indooroopilly

Register Now | Upcoming Lectures

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Giovanni & Amanda’s Wedding, May 5, 2018

By Dr. Peter Vardy

 

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