Sacristan

sacristan

The Sacristan’s role is to set up for Mass and coordinate the cleaning up/closing up after Mass. Volunteers are welcome to offer this service at the Mass that suits them and be placed on a roster. New sacristans are trained and supported in the role.

Please contact the Parish office or Father if you are interested in this ministry. Parish Office is located beneath the Church

Opening Hours: Mon and Fri 9.00am - 12 noon, Wed 9.00am - 3p.m.
Phone: 07 3371 7446
Fax: 3870 2541
Email: indooroopilly@bne.catholic.net.au

The Archdiocese of Brisbane has implemented standards of conduct for voluntary church workers to maintain a safe and healthy ministry environment. Our commitment to these standards requires that we conduct background referencing for all persons who intend to engage in voluntary ministry having direct and regular involvement with children and vulnerableadults.

SAFEGUARDING POLICY: Our commitment to maintaining a safe and healthy ministry environment requires that we conduct background referencing for all persons who intend to engage in voluntary ministry having direct and regular involvement with children and vulnerable adults

wreath

xmas-special

Holy Family Indooroopilly 

 

Christmas Events and Mass Times

×

Ann Paxton-Hall

Ann Paxton-Hall

×

Easter 2017 

          ( No Mass on Easter Sunday Evening) 

×

×
From Father Nev

22-3-19 – Don’t plant a fig tree in the vineyard!!

 Hi everyone, welcome to the Third Week of Lent. The Primary School has had their $1 million plus classroom development approved and construction will commence after the last day of Term 1 which is the 5th of April. Please be aware that if you park on Cecil St or Central Ave to come to Weekday or Weekend Mass you not be able to walk through the school. You will have walk right around to access the Church. Construction is estimated to last the whole length of Term 2. John the Principal will do his best to keep us up to date with any ongoing issues or delays. You may notice school furniture being stored in the Parish Hall, Morgan Howe and other rooms over the next couple of months. So this weekend’s readings are quite interesting. They look straight forward but as my fellow Lenten Program pilgrims can attest there are a number of layers!! We talked about what does repent mean? Some people said it means to be sorry. Others said it was acknowledging that we have done something wrong. Repent means to turn away from sin. This raises the question, if we are not aware that what we are doing is a sin then how can we repent? On Ash Wednesday the priest might have said to you as he was asking your forehead “Repent from sin and believe in the Gospel”. This means not only are we turning from the sin we are conscious of, but we are then compelled to believe and practice living out the Good News. Someone shared that the Greek Word for repent is metanoia. Metanoia implies a deep transformative journey through penitence and spiritual conversion. This week’s Gospel talks about planting a fig tree in the vineyard. If you were a savvy gardener, you would never ever do this. The fig tree’s roots are extensive and run deep. The fig tree would deplete the vineyard of nutrients and the shade it would bring would not be conductive to bear the best grapes. Do we sabotage God’s work through acts of selfishness and pride? Do we do so many things through obligation or habit that we are failing to flourish as Jesus intended? Despite our misguidedness, Jesus persists with our failings and ultimately shows us mercy. If God wanted to he could cut down everyone of us because we can’t possibly live up to his expectations. He did this with the Flood in Genesis but He vowed to never do this again. Jesus then comes amongst us and says be merciful just as my Father is merciful. As we work though the barrenness of our sinfulness know that our Lord is compassion and as strive to be fruitful followers.

Blessings Fr Nev

×
Christmas Message from Archbishop Mark Coleridge

×

Brisbane Archdiocese Video Series – The Mass

×

By Dr. Peter VardyTHE REFORMATION TODAY: AN ECUMENICAL PERSPECTIVE 

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Many historians consider the Reformation one of those epoch changing events in the history of the Western world. But what does it mean for people in Australia 500 years later? Was the Reformation just a series of pointless disputes which have little relevance to the church today? Or is the church today the living legacy of the Reformation, and if so, what does this mean for us? Join us as we ask these questions together.

Dr. Chris Hanlon — The Reformation a Catholic perspective, 8 August 7:30pm Holy Family Catholic Church, Indooroopilly

Register Now | Upcoming Lectures

×
Giovanni & Amanda’s Wedding, May 5, 2018

By Dr. Peter Vardy

 

×